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Child Custody Law Firm Breckenridge, CO

Child Custody Law Firm in Breckenridge, CO

Here at our child custody law firm Breckenridge, CO Zweig Law, PC, we know that no two families are exactly alike. Family law courts take this obvious reality into consideration when constructing and approving child custody and visitation agreements. Each set of child custody orders must be created with a child’s best interests in mind, as the “best interests of the child” standard is what courts use as guidance when settling custody and visitation disputes. Similarly, courts tasked with approving or rejecting custody and visitation arrangements created by a child’s parents during mediation or attorney-led negotiation must also base their decisions upon this standard.

As a lawyer at our child custody law firm in Breckenridge may tell you, there is no single “correct” way to construct a child custody and visitation arrangement. Any provisions within such an agreement must simply be based upon the affected child’s best interests. These interests may be grounded in a child’s age, schooling situation, special needs, medical conditions, relationship with his or her parents, sibling status and a host of other factors. Keeping these factors in mind will aid parents seeking to construct custody and visitation calendars in the wake of a decision to separate or divorce.

For example, if a child is bonded to both parents, both parents are fit caregivers, and both parents live within a reasonable distance of one another, it may benefit that child to spend time with each parent regularly. While the child may live primarily with one parent, the other may see the child every other weekend, on major holidays in alternating years, for a significant portion of the summer holidays and for a weekday evening every week. If this kind of alternating schedule does not serve the child’s best interests, parents may talk with our child custody law firm in Colorado about how it can be altered as much or as little as may benefit him or her.

Similarly, if a child is bonded to each parent and both parents are fit caregivers but live quite far from one another, visitation or parenting time schedule may be modified to reflect that child’s best interests. While the child in question may need to remain in one parent’s care far more often in order to attend school, perhaps he or she can spend the entire summer, certain major holidays and alternating significant school vacations with his or her other parent. When it comes to meeting a child’s needs, whatever a family can work out in order to serve those interests will likely be approved by the courts. If a family cannot settle on an arrangement, the courts will do their best to construct an appropriate schedule.

Common Myths About Child Custody

When you are arranging for the custody of a child, you may have read or heard many different things; however, not all information may be true. As a child custody law firm in Breckinridge, Colorado, we at Zweig Law, PC  know of many myths that mislead parents and have the ability to cause a great deal of confusion. The following are the most common myths about child custody. 

Living Arrangements Don’t Need to Be Shared 

If you have shared custody or visitation rights, it is your legal duty to let your ex spouse know about any changes in living arrangements. For example, if you allow a new partner to move in, you should notify your ex. The reason for this is to protect your children. If your new partner has a criminal record, your ex-spouse has a right to know about this. As far as the court is concerned, the welfare of the child comes first. Should your ex-spouse be against a new living arrangement, you can consult a Breckinridge, Colorado child custody law firm  for further advice. 

You Must Stay Within the State

As long as the court has not ordered you to stay within the state, you should be allowed to go out of state for a vacation or to visit friends or family. However, you should, in good faith, let your ex-spouse know about your trip ahead of time. You should also provide your children with a method of communicating with their mother or father. The last thing you want is to be accused of running away with your children. 

You Don’t Have to Let the Grandparents See the Children

Sometimes a mother or father will choose not to be involved with their children, and as a result, the grandparents are unable to see them. Just because a parent does not want to see their children, or has been ordered to not be around them, the grandparents do have a right to visit their grandchildren. Most states have laws that apply to grandparents rights. If this is true, they may be able to file for visitation or custody rights. 

The Police Can Be Called to Enforce an Order

If the children are in danger or there is a threat of violence, you should not waste any time in calling the police. However, if you call the police because you are trying to enforce an order, you will likely be told to call your child custody law firm in Breckinridge, Colorado. 

You Don’t Have to Talk with Your Ex

While you might not want to communicate with your ex, when children are involved, you will be encouraged to maintain an amicable relationship with him or her. Some parents will choose to relay messages through their children, but this generally does not work – nor is it recommended. Even minimal interaction is better than none at all. If communication is very problematic, there are services that act as communication outlets, as well as, electronic options. 

You Don’t Have to Pay Child Support if You Give Up Custody

Even if you never want to see your children, you will need to pay child support. You might even find that your payments increase. The reason for this is that your ex-spouse will have more responsibilities for their care and well being. The only way to avoid child custody and support is to give up your parental rights. 

You Can Pay Less Child Support By Paying for More Things

Some parents believe their child support payments will be decreased when they opt to pay for more things, such as clothing. The only way this is possible is through a written agreement that supplants the payment in lieu of purchasing certain items. This can get complicated; therefore, a child custody law firm in Breckinridge, Colorado might advise the payments to be paid and allow your ex to purchase the items with that money. 

Child Custody and Visitation Guidance Is Available

If you have questions about child custody and/or visitation, please consider connecting with our Colorado child custody law firm Zweig Law, PC. Every family’s situation is unique and it is therefore difficult to determine what a custody arrangement drafted in the best interests of an affected child might look like until an attorney explores that family’s unique circumstances as a whole.

Speaking with an attorney will not obligate you to take any specific form of action. What it will do is allow you to ask questions, receive counsel regarding your available legal options and ultimately make an informed decision about how best to move forward. Whether your child custody situation is amicable or contentious, speaking with our Breckenridge, CO child custody law firm attorneys at Zweig Law, PC can help you navigate it as smoothly as is possible.